Journeys In The Kali Yuga: An Interview With Aki Cederberg

Aki Cederberg is the author of the recently-released Journeys In The Kali Yuga. Cederberg is an author, musician, and filmmaker from Finnland who traveled to in India. Living there and studying the spiritual traditions of that country over many years, he came to contemplate the emptiness of modernity and the problems of the Kali Yuga (Iron Age) that face both India and the West.

In the book, and in this interview, he discusses India, Hindu spiritual traditions and discipleship, the West, and paganism.

Continue reading “Journeys In The Kali Yuga: An Interview With Aki Cederberg”

The Death and Rebirth of Culture

I recently made the mistake of purchasing a used book online, not realizing that it had a previous owner’s comments scrawled inside. Although I, like probably everyone who still has a quaint attachment to paper, have seen this before, I was struck by these comments in particular.

Though short — mostly only four or five words at most — the scribbler’s nauseating snobbish personality and sense of self-importance shined through. He had dated many of his worthless comments, addressed the publisher (Oxford University Press) in several of them — as if to psychically alert them to his overblown sense of self-importance — and had concluded the 300-plus page book with, “Interesting, but reference material.” He had, of course, signed and dated this as well, as if it were equivalent to Picasso signing Guernica. Continue reading “The Death and Rebirth of Culture”

Syncretism Versus Sublimation: Thoughts on Developing an Esoteric Culture

Recently, in response to my article “Creating a Tribal Culture: Principles and Pitfalls,” I was asked whether Freemasonry was syncretic. It’s a good question, though the short answer is that I do not. However, prompted by the question, I thought I’d take the opportunity to look at syncretism, and what we might call sublimation, in regard to developing a culture, a group, organization, or movement, etc.

Sublimation has occurred throughout history. Shaolin martial arts absorbed elements of Buddhism (itself of Indian origin), Taoism, and various Chi exercises (that had already been absorbed into Taoism), etc. Islamic gnosticism absorbed the philosophy of Aristotle and Plato. The Catholic Church absorbed the thought of Aristotle and was shaped by the religious imagery and festivals it encountered as it swept (not always peacefully) across Europe. Christian mysticism borrowed very significantly from Cabala and Hermeticism (the latter of which itself leaned heavily on ancient Greek imagery). Though no one would suggest that these are syncretic. Continue reading “Syncretism Versus Sublimation: Thoughts on Developing an Esoteric Culture”