The Cowardice of Defeatism

Some time ago, a casual acquaintance of mine complained to me that he had no real friends, no real interests outside of work, and that, although he was dating, it wasn’t going well. Wanting to help, I suggested that he join a gym or weightlifting group, and supplied him with contact information for several in his area. This would give him some kind of routine — and purpose — outside work, I thought to myself, and his body would improve (which would be better for his health, and for attracting women), and, of course, he would make friends.

When, a couple of months later, I ran into him again, nothing had changed. He hadn’t contacted any gyms or any of the groups I suggested, and he hadn’t made any other steps to improve his life, which he now described as “not worth living.”

Perhaps he really had no interest in improving himself physically (even if it would have a positive affect on his spiritual and mental well being and on his life in general). And, certainly, we all go through periods of stress, despondency, or of feeling “stuck.”

I have noticed over the last year, however, a certain attitude of pessimism or defeatism in some people who consider themselves to be very serious, hardcore, and uncompromising individuals. Continue reading “The Cowardice of Defeatism”

Return of The True Nobles

There is an infographic making the rounds that goes like this: “Bad times make strong men. Strong men make good times. Good times make weak men. Weak men make bad times.” Anyone with an interest in history can hear the truth in that. Decadence and debauchery, when made cultural norms invariably leads to a weakening of society. This makes society then ripe for a group of “Strong Men” to take it for their own.

But who are these “Strong Men”? Who are these noble folk who conquered territory and set the roots for powerful, world stretching civilizations? How can we become like them? To get to that point I feel it’s important for us to examine the word “Noble”. Continue reading “Return of The True Nobles”

Ancient and Modern Consciousness: And Living With Them

According to the ancient Greek poet Hesiod (8th century), the gods made several races of mortal men, one after the other as each met its demise. The first and the best was a golden race, the second was made of silver, the third bronze, and the fourth and worst was made of iron.

Hesiod’s notion of what we might call a “Golden Age,” an “Iron Age,” and so on, is reminiscent of the Hindu idea of the Yugas (Ages), descending from the Satya Yuga (Age of Truth) to the Kali Yuga (Age of Darkness), the latter of which, claimed French metaphysician Rene Guenon, is the one we are living in. Continue reading “Ancient and Modern Consciousness: And Living With Them”