Ogygia or Archeology and Pandora’s “Box”

In 1815, a Greek scholar and author by the name of Athanasios Stagiritis[1] (1780 – 1840) published in Katharevousa (an early form of the modern Greek language) one of the most important texts on the Ancient Greek tradition titled Gr. Ὠγυγία ἤ Ἀρχαιολογία (En. Ogygia or Archeology).  This 5-volume text explores the ancient Greek tradition, its customs and society, including numerous annotations of poets and writers of that time.  The original text is extremely rare to find and was only recently reprinted in Modern Greek after almost 200 years in obscurity.  Moreover, it has never been translated into English.  Even though it is impossible to transfer the totality of its wealth here, it is important to share some of its content in order to inspire interest in the author and in the text, specifically on his transmission of the Greek myth of Pandora’s Box – a myth which first appears in written form in Hesiod’s Theogony (800-700 BCE) (lines 560–612)[2], and is later elaborated upon in his Works and Days (700 BCE) (lines 60–105)[3]. The Pandora myth offers a timeless message of hope that is as relevant today as it ever was, while providing a meaningful connection to the divine. The text that follows is an English translation of Pandora’s myth as it appears in Stagiritis’ first volume of Ogygia or Archeology.  Continue reading “Ogygia or Archeology and Pandora’s “Box””

Seeing The Good Is a Choice

A few months ago, I made a flying visit to Dallas to present a lecture. Only 30 minutes before I left for the airport did I receive some unwelcome news that could have meant a sharp decline in my income. In the past, I would have been stressed — and the news was certainly unwelcome. But instead of worrying about the future, I focused on what might be a gateway opened to a new adventure and to new possibilities. Nothing is static in life, and it is essential to embrace the future with a positive mind. Continue reading “Seeing The Good Is a Choice”

For it is a Human Number

“Pythagoras and his followers wrote the precepts of their doctrines in cubical arrangement,” we read in Vitruvius’ De Architectura (Book V, Preface), “the cube containing two hundred and sixteen verses, of which they thought that not more than three should be allotted to any one precept.”

Notably, 216 is the result of 6 raised to the third power. Ever since the ancient Chaldeans, the number 6 represented the act of creation, so it was considered to be the perfect number. Again, among the Platonic Solids described in Timaeus is the Cube, a congruent and regular six-square-face polygon, is representative of “Earth” though with a deeper significance. Continue reading “For it is a Human Number”